Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Dec 2009

Wednesday 18th September 2019


Key notifiable disease trends

  • Brucellosis:  One brucellosis case still under investigation was notified in December 2009 from Bay of Plenty DHB.  An alternative diagnosis is considered more likely; however, laboratory results are pending.
  • Cryptosporidiosis:  47 cryptosporidiosis cases were notified in December 2009 compared to 36 cases during the same month of the previous year (Figure 1).  The cases ranged in age from <1 year to 70+ years, with the highest number of cases in the 1-4 years age group (14 cases).  No cases were hospitalised.  Among the cases where risk factor information was recorded, 61.5% (8/13) had faecal contact, 47.4% (9/19) attended school, 35.7% (5/14) had contact with a symptomatic person, 35.7% (5/14) had recreational water contact, 23.1% (3/13) consumed untreated water, 21.4% (3/14) had contact with a sick animal, 21.4% (3/14) had consumed food from a food premise, 20.0% (3/15) had contact with farm animals and 6.3% (1/16) were overseas during the incubation period.  Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were detected in faecal specimens for 95.7% (45/47) of the cases.
  • Hydatid disease:  One probable case of hydatid disease from Auckland DHB was notified in December 2009.  The case was born in Taiwan and has had farm exposure in New Zealand.  This case is still under investigation.  A second case from Auckland DHB has since been de-notified upon further investigation.
  • Leptospirosis:  22 cases of leptospirosis (15 confirmed, 1 probable, and 6 under investigation) were notified in December 2009 compared with seven in the preceding month and 13 in the same month of the previous year (Figure 2).  The highest number of cases was reported from Waikato DHB (7 cases), followed by Canterbury DHB (5 cases).  Of the 15 cases with an occupation recorded, seven (46.7%) were farmers or farm workers, two (13.3%) worked in the meat processing industry, and there was one of each of the following: electrician, homemaker (on lifestyle block with cows), park ranger, stock agent, truck driver and veterinary nurse.  The Leptospira serovar was available for 11 of the 22 notified cases: L. Hardjo (8 cases), L. Ballum (1 case), L. Pomona (1 case) and L. Tarassovi (1 case). 
  • Measles:  Eight cases of measles (5 confirmed, 2 probable, and 1 under investigation) were notified in December 2009 compared with nine in the preceding month and zero in the same month of the previous year.  There were five laboratory confirmed cases.  The highest number of cases was reported from Auckland and West Coast DHBs (3 cases each), followed by Canterbury DHB (2 cases).  No cases were hospitalised.
  • Meningococcal disease:  Based on the earliest date available1, eight cases (7 laboratory-confirmed) of meningococcal disease were notified during December 2009.  In comparison, five cases were notified in the previous month, November 2009, and eight cases were notified during the same month last year, December 2008.  For the 12-month period ending 31 December 2009, Tairawhiti DHB recorded the highest incidence rate (13.0 per 100 000 population, 6 cases), followed by MidCentral (6.0 per 100 000 population, 10 cases) and Lakes DHB (4.9 per 100 000 population, 5 cases).  The age-specific incidence rate was highest in the less than 1 year age group (42.8 per 100 000 population, 27 cases), followed by those in the 1-4 years age group (14.4 per 100 000 population).
  • Non-seasonal influenza: In New Zealand, non seasonal influenza became notifiable on 29 April 2009.  Fourteen cases of non-seasonal influenza A (H1N1) were notified in December 2009 (all laboratory-confirmed) compared with eight in the preceding month.  Four cases were hospitalised.  The highest number of cases was reported by Capital and Coast DHB (6), followed by Counties Manukau and Canterbury DHBs (2 cases each).  For the latest information on the non seasonal influenza A (H1N1) situation in New Zealand see http://www.moh.govt.nz/influenza-a-h1n1.
  • Pertussis:  144 cases of pertussis were notified in December 2009, compared to 142 notifications in the preceding month and 65 notifications in the same month of the previous year.  There were 49 (34.0%) laboratory-confirmed cases.  The highest numbers of cases were reported by Canterbury DHB (29), followed by Waikato (28) and Capital and Coast (18) DHBs.  For the 12-month period ending 31 December 2009, the highest incidence rates were reported from West Coast (89.0 per 100 000 population, 29 cases) and Nelson Marlborough (67.3 per 100 000 population, 92 cases) DHBs compared to a national rate of 32.4 per 100 000 population.  The current 12-month rate by age group was highest amongst infants aged less than one year (183.9 per 100 000 population, 116 cases), followed by children in the 1-4 years age group (58.6 per 100 000 population, 142 cases).   Further analysis of pertussis notifications is available in the Pertussis Report which is updated fortnightly and available here.
  • Toxic shellfish poisoning:  Two cases of toxic shellfish poisoning were notified during December 2009.  One case of paralytic shellfish poisoning (still under investigation) was notified.  The 60-69 year old male from Bay of Plenty DHB ate steamed Tuatuas that were originally collected from Motiti Reserve.  The case was hospitalised.  One case of diarrhoeic shellfish poisoning was notified from Canterbury DHB.  Upon further investigation the case has since been de-notified.
  • Tuberculosis disease:  37 cases of tuberculosis disease were notified in December, all of these were cases of new tuberculosis disease (100.0%).  Twenty two cases were laboratory confirmed.  The highest number of cases was reported from Counties Manukau DHB (9 cases), followed by Auckland DHB (6 cases).  Of the 27 (73.0%) cases for which place of birth was recorded, 17 (63.0%) were born outside New Zealand.  Cases were distributed by age as follows: 1-4 years (4 cases), 5-14 years (2 cases), 15-24 years (2 cases), 25-44 years (16 cases) and 65 years or greater (4 cases).  Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated for 16 cases and the organism for the remaining six laboratory confirmed cases was unknown.


1The ‘earliest’ date refers to the earliest recorded date for the case (onset or hospitalisation date rather than report date, if available). ‘Earliest’ date, as opposed to ‘report date’ alone, is used throughout the analysis of meningococcal disease notification data.


Note: Click on the document links below to open. These documents are in PDF format. You will need to download the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them.

Report:

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Dec 2009

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Dec 2009

Monthly DHB Totals - Dec 2009

Monthly Rolling Totals - Dec 2009

 

DOWNLOADS

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Dec 2009

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Dec 2009

Monthly DHB Totals - Dec 2009

Monthly Rolling Totals - Dec 2009

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