Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Feb 2010

Friday 20th September 2019


Key notifiable disease trends

  • Campylobacteriosis: 705 campylobacteriosis cases were notified in February 2010 compared to 594 cases in the same month of the previous year. Five hundred and ninety five cases were reported to be laboratory-confirmed. For the 12 month period ending 28 February 2010, the highest incidence rates were reported from Hutt Valley (271.9 per 100 000 population, 388 cases) and Capital and Coast (253.7 per 100 000, 731 cases) DHBs compared to a national rate of 170.0 per 100 000.
  • Hepatitis A: Seven hepatitis A cases were notified in February 2010 compared to three in the same month of the previous year. Ethnicity was reported as Asian (3 cases), European (3 cases) and is unknown for the remaining case. Five cases reported overseas travel during the incubation period (71.4%, 5/7) and countries visited included Fiji (2 cases), India (2 cases), Australia, United Arab Emirates and Vanuatu (1 case each). The two remaining cases had unknown overseas travel history and have since been de-notified.
  • Legionellosis: 31 cases of legionellosis were notified in February 2010 (3 confirmed, 4 probable and 24 under investigation) compared to eight notified cases in the same month of the previous year (Figure 1). The highest number of cases were from Counties Manukau (9 cases), Northland (7 cases), Waitemata (6 cases) and Auckland (3 cases) DHBs. The cases were distributed by age as follows 1-4 years (1 case), 5-9 years (2 cases), 10-14 years (1 case), 15-19 years (2 cases), 20-29 years (1 case), 30-39 years (4 cases), 40-49 years (8 cases), 50-59 years (6 cases), 60-69 years (3 cases) and 70+ years (3 cases).  Fifteen of the cases were hospitalised.  The species involved was identified for 12 cases; Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 or 2 (4 cases), L. longbeachae serogroup 1 (2 cases), L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (2 cases), L. gormanii (1 case), L. longbeachae serogroup 2 (1 case), L. pneumophila serogroup 4 (1 case) and L. pneumophila serogroup 12 (1 case).
  • Leptospirosis: 15 cases of leptospirosis (9 confirmed and 6 under investigation) were notified in February 2010 compared with 15 in the preceding month and two in the same month of the previous year (Figure 2).  The highest number of cases was reported from Hawke’s Bay DHB (4 cases), followed by Bay of Plenty and Nelson Marlborough (2 cases each) DHBs. Of the eight cases with an occupation recorded, four (50.0%) were farmers and there was one of each of the following: hunter-trapper, labourer, meat process worker and stock truck driver. The Leptospira serovar was available for eight of the 15 notified cases: L. Ballum (5 cases), L. Tarassovi (2 cases) and L. Hardjo (1 case).
  • Meningococcal disease: Based on the earliest date available1, four cases of meningococcal disease were notified during February 2010, none of which were laboratory-confirmed. In comparison, seven were notified in the previous month, January 2010, and nine cases were notified during the same month in 2009. For the 12 month period ending 28 February 2010, Tairawhiti DHB recorded the highest incidence rate of 13.0 per 100 000 population (6 cases), followed by MidCentral (5.4 per 100 000, 9 cases) and Northland (4.5 per 100 000, 7 cases) DHBs. The highest age-specific incidence rate was in infants aged less than one year (42.8 per 100 000 population, 27 cases), followed by those in the 1-4 years age group (12.8 per 100 000, 31 cases).
  • Taeniasis: One case of laboratory-confirmed taeniasis was notified in February 2010. The 40-49 year old African female from Counties Manukau DHB was in Ethiopia during the incubation period and regularly consumes raw meat.
  • Tetanus: Two confirmed cases of tetanus were notified in February. A 40-49 year old European male from Waitemata DHB probably contracted tetanus from a nail which punctured his foot. A 60-69 year old European female from Hutt Valley DHB probably contract tetanus from a foot laceration while working in the garden. Both cases were hospitalised.

1 The ‘earliest’ date refers to the earliest recorded date for the case (onset or hospitalisation date rather than report date, if available). ‘Earliest’ date, as opposed to ‘report date’ alone, is used throughout the analysis of meningococcal disease notification data

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Report:

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Feb 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Feb 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Feb 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Feb 2010

 

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Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Feb 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Feb 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Feb 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Feb 2010

Ph: +64 4 914 0700 Fax: +64 4 914 0770 Email: survqueries@esr.cri.nz