Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Mar 2010

Wednesday 18th September 2019


Key notifiable disease trends

  • Campylobacteriosis: 571 campylobacteriosis cases were notified in March 2010 compared to 507 cases in the same month of the previous year.  Four hundred and sixty eight cases were laboratory-confirmed.  For the 12-month period ending 31 March 2010, the highest incidence rates were reported from Hutt Valley (272.6 per 100 000 population, 389 cases), Capital and Coast (249.2 per 100 000, 718 cases) and Taranaki (244.8 per 100 000, 265 cases) DHBs compared to a national rate of 171.4 per 100 000.
  • Cryptosporidiosis: 108 cryptosporidiosis cases were notified in March 2010 compared to 50 cases during the same month of the previous year.  The cases ranged in age from less than 1 year to greater than 70+ years, with the highest number of cases in the 1-4 years age group (27 cases).  One case was hospitalised.  Canterbury DHB reported the highest number of cases (43 cases), followed by Waitemata (17 cases), and Waikato (9 cases) DHBs.  Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were detected in faecal specimens for 92.6% (100/108) of the cases.  Three interim Cryptosporidium outbreaks involving four cases were reported in March.
  • Giardiasis: 218 giardiasis cases were notified in March 2010 compared to 183 notified in the same month the previous year (Figure 1).  Auckland DHB reported the highest number of cases (37 cases), followed by Waikato (36 cases), and Waitemata (28 cases) DHBs.  Twenty Giardia outbreaks (ten interim and ten final) involving 52 cases were reported in March.
  • Hepatitis A: Six hepatitis A cases were notified in March 2010 compared to two in the same month of the previous year.  Ethnicity was reported as Pacific Peoples and European (2 cases each) and is unknown for the remaining two cases.  Three cases reported overseas travel during the incubation period (50.0%, 3/6) and countries visited included Samoa, South Africa and Vanuatu (each 1 case).  Two cases did not report overseas travel during the incubation period.  Of the two, one was exposed to human sewage through their occupation and the other case had no obvious risk factors. The remaining case had unknown travel history and has since been de-notified.
  • Hepatitis B: Six cases of hepatitis B were notified in March 2010 compared to one in the same month of the previous year. Ethnicity was reported as European (3 cases), Asian (1 case) and is unknown for the remaining two cases. Among the cases for which risk factor information was reported, 50.0% (2/4) had sexual contact with a confirmed case (or carrier), 25.0% (1/4) had a history of injecting drug use, and 25.0% (1/4) had household contact with a confirmed case (or carrier).
  • Legionellosis: 20 cases of legionellosis were notified in March 2010 (2 confirmed, 5 probable and 13 under investigation) compared to seven in the same month of the previous year.  The highest number of cases were from Auckland (5 cases), Waitemata (5 cases) and Northland (4 cases) DHBs.  The cases were distributed by age as follows 10-14 years (1 case), 15-19 years (1 case), 20-29 years (2 cases), 30-39 years (1 case), 40-49 years (5 cases), 50-59 years (2 cases), 60-69 years (5 cases) and 70+ years (3 cases).  Seven of the cases were hospitalised. One death from Hawke's Bay DHB was reported.  The species involved was identified in nine cases; Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 or 2 (2 cases), L. longbeachae serogroup 2 (1 case), L. longbeachae - serogroup not determined (1 case), L. bozemanae serogroup 1 or 2 (1 case), L. dumoffii (1 case), L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen (1 case), L. pneumophila serogroup 15 (1 case), and L. pneumophila – serogroup not determined (1 case). 
  • Leptospirosis: 16 cases of leptospirosis (9 confirmed, 1 probable and 6 under investigation) were notified in March 2010 compared to eight in the same month of the previous year. The highest number of cases was reported from MidCentral and Waikato DHBs (4 cases each), followed by Hawke's Bay (3 cases) DHB. Of the nine cases with occupation recorded, four (44.4%) were farmers, two (22.2%) were meat workers, and there was one of each of the following: stock-agent, semi-retired (works in the kiwifruit industry), and furniture maker. The Leptospira serovar was recoded in eight cases: L. Tarassovi (3 cases), L. Ballum (2 cases), L. Pomona (2 cases), and L. Canicola (1 case).
  • Measles: 21 cases of measles (10 confirmed, 8 probable, and 3 under investigation) were notified in March 2010 compared to 11 in the same month of the previous year (Figure 2).  There were four laboratory confirmed cases.  The majority of cases were reported from Northland DHB (85.7%, 18 cases) followed by Capital and Coast, Nelson Marlborough, and Canterbury (each one case) DHBs. No cases were hospitalised.
  • Meningococcal disease: Based on the earliest date available1, 12 cases of meningococcal disease were notified during March 2010, 10 of which were laboratory-confirmed).  In comparison, three cases were notified in the previous month, February 2010, and four during same month last year, March 2009. For the 12 month period ending 31 March 2010, Tairawhiti DHB recorded the highest incidence rate of 13.0 per 100 000 population (6 cases), followed by MidCentral (5.4 per 100 000, 9 cases) and Hawke’s Bay (4.5 per 100 000, 7 cases) DHBs. The highest age-specific rate was in infants aged less than one year (46.0 per 100,000 population, 29 cases), followed by those in the   1-4 years age group (14.0 per 100,000, 34 cases).
  • Mumps: 13 cases of mumps (3 confirmed, 4 probable, and 6 under investigation) were notified in March 2010 compared with three in the same month of the previous year.  There were three laboratory-confirmed cases.  The highest number of cases was reported from Counties Manukau DHB (3 cases), followed by Waitemata, Auckland and Taranaki (2 cases each) DHBs. No cases were hospitalised.  
  • Taeniasis: One case of laboratory-confirmed taeniasis was notified in March 2010.  The 15-19 year old African male from Capital and Coast DHB was in Ethiopia during the incubation period and the probable source of exposure was meat consumed during that time. He has had taeniasis in the past. 
  • Tetanus: One confirmed case of tetanus was notified in March 2010. The 70+ year old European female from Auckland DHB who was a keen gardener died after two days of hospitalisation.
  • Hazardous substances injury: Three probable cases of hazardous substances injury were reported in March.  A female aged 40-49 years and a male aged 30-39 years from Waitemata DHB were exposed to Tordon® (Metsulfuron Methyl Triclopyr) resulting from aerial spraydrift from a neighbouring farm.  A male aged 60-69 years from Waitemata DHB accidentally inhaled styrene fumes and was hospitalised.

The ‘earliest’ date refers to the earliest recorded date for the case (onset or hospitalisation date rather than report date, if available). ‘Earliest’ date, as opposed to ‘report date’ alone, is used throughout the analysis of meningococcal disease notification data.   

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Report:

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Mar 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Mar 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Mar 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Mar 2010

 

DOWNLOADS

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Mar 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Mar 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Mar 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Mar 2010

Ph: +64 4 914 0700 Fax: +64 4 914 0770 Email: survqueries@esr.cri.nz