Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Oct 2010

Saturday 21st September 2019


Key notifiable disease trends

  • Enterobacter (Cronobacter) sakazakii: A laboratory confirmed case of Enterobacter sakazakii was notified by Bay of Plenty DHB in October 2010. The case was a 70 year old male of Maori ethnic origin, who was hospitalised, and died two days later from metastatic carcinoma. The case had not been overseas during the incubation period. A possible source was milk and yoghurt products recently introduced into his diet. This was a single isolated case.
  • Giardiasis: 139 cases of giardiasis were notified in October 2010 compared to 101 cases notified in the same month of the previous year. The highest number of cases were reported in Auckland and Counties Manukau DHBs (21 cases each), followed by Canterbury (19 cases) and Waikato DHBs (18 cases). Among the cases where risk information was recorded, 41.5% (17/41) had contact with other symptomatic people, 39.0% (16/41) had contact with farm animals, 35.9% (14/39) had contact with faecal matter, 32.4% (11/34) had consumed untreated water, and 28.6% (12/42) had been overseas during the incubation period. Six Giardia outbreaks (2 completed, 4 interim) involving 10 cases were reported in October.
  • Hepatitis A: One laboratory-confirmed case of hepatitis A was notified in October 2010 compared to nine cases notified in the same month of the previous year.  The case was a female in the 20-29 years age group of Asian ethnicity who had been overseas during the incubation period.
  • Hydatid disease: One probable case of hydatid disease was notified in October 2010. The case was a male in the 60-69 years age group from Hawke’s Bay DHB. The disease was probably a remote past infection. MAF has been notified.
  • Legionellosis: 34 cases of legionellosis were notified in October 2010 (9 confirmed, 2 probable and 23 under investigation) compared to four in the same month of the previous year (Figure 1). The following section is based on confirmed and probable cases only. The cases were from Canterbury (5 cases), Bay of Plenty (2 cases), Waitemata, Waikato, Otago and Southland (1 case each) DHBs. Cases were aged between 30-39 years and over 70 years, with 90.9% (10/11) of cases aged over 40 years. Nine cases were hospitalised.  The Legionella species was identified in five cases; Legionella dumoffii, L. jordanis, L. longbeachae serogroup 1, L. longbeachae serogroup 1 or 2, and L. pneumophila serogroup 12 (1 case each).
  • Meningococcal disease: Based on the earliest date available, seven cases of meningococcal disease were notified during October 2010, four (57.1%) of which were laboratory-confirmed.  In comparison, four cases (all laboratory-confirmed) were notified in the previous month and 11 (all laboratory-confirmed) during the same month last year. For the 12-month period ending 31 October 2010, the highest incidence rate was reported in Tairawhiti DHB (6.5 per 100 000 population, 3 cases), followed by Hutt Valley (4.9 per 100 000, 7 cases), Northland (4.5 per 100 000, 7 cases) and MidCentral (4.2 per 100 000, 7 cases) DHBs.  The highest age-specific rate was in infants aged less than one year 36.5 per 100 000 population, 23 cases), followed by those in the 1-4 years age group (10.3 per 100 000, 25 cases).
  • Rickettsial disease: One confirmed case of rickettsial disease was notified in Oct 2010. The case had not travelled overseas during the disease incubation period and is assumed to have acquired the infection in New Zealand.
  • Salmonellosis: 111 cases of salmonellosis were notified in October 2010 compared to 117 the previous month as well as 83 cases the same month of previous year. There were 109 (98.2%) laboratory-confirmed cases. The highest numbers of cases were reported from Otago (18 cases), Canterbury (17 cases), Auckland (15 cases), and Southland (12 cases) DHBs. The cases were aged between less than one year and over 70 years, with the highest numbers of cases in the 1-4 years (28 cases), 20-29 years (15 cases), 5-9 years (12 cases), and 50-59 (10 cases) age groups. Of the 59 cases with hospitalisation information, six were hospitalised. The serotype involved was identified in 80 of the cases, and the dominant serotypes were Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 160 (13 cases), S. Brandenburg (9 cases), S. Typhimurium phage type 135 (7 cases), S. Typhimurium phage type 9 and S. Typhimurium phage type RDNC-May 06 (5 cases each). One of the cases was linked to a Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 101 outbreak. Exposure factors included consumption of unpasteurised milk from a dairy shed and contact with infected livestock.
  • Tuberculosis disease: 28 cases of tuberculosis disease were notified in October 2010, compared to 37 cases notified in the previous month and 12 cases notified in the same month of the previous year. Twelve (42.9%) of the cases were laboratory confirmed. The highest number of cases was reported in Counties Manukau DHB (6 cases), followed by Auckland, Bay of Plenty, and Canterbury DHBs (4 cases each). Cases were aged between 1-4 years and 70+ years, with the highest number of cases in the 30-39 years age group (9 cases).  Ethnicity was recorded for 21 cases (75.0%): Asian (12 cases), Pacific Peoples (4 cases), European (4 cases) and Maori (1 case). Eleven cases were born outside of New Zealand, of which three had been born in India.
  • Yersiniosis: 44 yersiniosis cases were notified in October 2010 compared to 37 notifications in the preceding month and 37 cases the same month of previous year (Figure 3). Three cases were hospitalised. Taranaki DHB had the highest numbers of cases (10 cases) followed by Waitemata (8 cases) and Waikato (5 cases) DHBs. The highest number of cases was in the 50 to 59 years old (8 cases), 1 to 4 and 20 to 29 (7 cases each) followed by the 40-49 years (5 cases) age groups. The biotype involved was identified in 32 of the cases, and the dominant biotypes were Yersinia enterocolitica Biotype 2 (16 cases), Y. enterocolitica Biotype 4 (8 cases), Y. enterocolitica Biotype 1A and Y. enterocolitica Biotype 3 (4 cases each).  Yersinia pseudotuberculosis occurred in one case.


1 The ‘earliest’ date refers to the earliest recorded date for the case (onset or hospitalisation date rather than report date, if available). ‘Earliest’ date, as opposed to ‘report date’ alone, is used throughout the analysis of meningococcal disease notification data.   

Note: Click on the document links below to open. These documents are in PDF format. You will need to download the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view them.

Report:

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Oct 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Oct 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Oct 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Oct 2010

 

DOWNLOADS

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - Oct 2010

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - Oct 2010

Monthly DHB Totals - Oct 2010

Monthly Rolling Totals - Oct 2010

Ph: +64 4 914 0700 Fax: +64 4 914 0770 Email: survqueries@esr.cri.nz