Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - May 2012

Friday 20th September 2019


Key notifiable disease trends

  •    Brucellosis: One case of brucellosis (female aged 20-29 years) was notified in May 2012 from Southern DHB. This case has since been made “not a case” after further investigation.
  •   Campylobacteriosis: 520 campylobacteriosis cases were notified in May 2012 compared to 482 cases notified in the same month of the previous year (Figure 1). For the 12 month period ending 31 May 2012, the highest rates were in South Canterbury (278.5 per 100 000 population, 157 cases), Wairarapa (234.1 per 100 000 population, 95 cases), and Hawke's Bay (230.4 per 100 000 population, 359 cases) DHBs compared to a national rate of 170.5 per 100 000. Three Campylobacter outbreaks were reported from Waikato DHB in May. Two outbreaks involved a total of 5 cases while the total number of cases for the third outbreak is yet to be finalised.
  •   Cholera: One case of cholera was notified in May 2012. This case has since been made “not a case” after further investigation.
  •     Lead absorption: 47 cases of lead absorption were notified in May 2012 (44 confirmed and 3 under investigation), compared with 20 cases notified the previous month and 19 cases in the same month of the previous year.  45 of the cases were male and two were female.  The highest numbers of cases were reported in the Auckland region (37 cases).  For cases where age information was available, the majority were aged between 40 and 69 years (70.2%, 33/47).  Where information was recorded, 92.3% (24/26) had exposure to lead materials at their place of work.
  •     Hydatid disease: One case of hydatid disease was notified in May 2012 and is currently under investigation. The case is a male in the 70+ years age group and was reported from Southern DHB.  The case is not considered to have had a recent exposure to the disease.
  •     Rheumatic fever: 22 cases of rheumatic fever were notified in May 2012, compared to 12 cases during the same month last year. All 22 cases were initial attacks of rheumatic fever.  Of the 22 cases, 21 (95.5%) were hospitalised. The majority of cases were notified from the North Island (21/22, 95.5%) with the highest number of cases notified from Counties Manukau (8) and Waikato (5) DHBs. Cases were reported among Māori (14 cases) and Pacific Peoples (7 cases) ethnic groups.  Ethnicity was not reported for the remaining case.  Most cases (21 cases) were aged between 5 and 14 years.
  •     Leptospirosis: 18 cases of leptospirosis were notified in May 2012 (8 confirmed, 2 probable and 8 under investigation), compared to six cases notified in the same month of the previous year. The following section relates to the 8 confirmed and 2 probable cases only. These cases were from Bay of Plenty, Canterbury (2 cases each), Counties Manukau, Waikato, Tairawhiti, MidCentral, West Coast and Southern (1 case each) DHBs. High risk occupations were recorded for seven cases: farmers or farm workers (6 cases) and  meat workers (1 case). Of the remaining three cases, one was a home insulation worker exposed to rat urine/faeces and another acquired the disease while in Australia. Risk factor information was unknown for one case. Leptospira species and serovars were recorded for six cases: Leptospira interrogans sv Pomona (2), and L. borgpetersenii sv Hardjo (3), and one sample cross-reacted with both Leptospira interrogans sv Pomona and L. borgpetersenii sv Hardjo.
  •     Pertussis: 572 cases of pertussis were notified in May 2012, compared with 324 cases notified the previous month and 63 cases in the same month of the previous year. This is the highest monthly notification total recorded since the peak of the 2004/2005 epidemic (613 cases were notified in November 2004). Twenty-four cases were hospitalised. There were 85 (14.9%) cases laboratory-confirmed by isolation of Bordetella pertussis from the nasopharynx. A further 155 (27.1%) cases were laboratory-confirmed by PCR. The highest number of cases were from Canterbury DHB (144), followed by Counties Manukau (59), Capital and Coast (55) and Nelson Marlborough (51) DHBs. Cases occurred in all age groups, with 19.4% (111/572 cases) under 5 years old, including 35 cases aged less than 1 year. The highest numbers occurred in the 1-4 years (76), 5-9 years (71), 40-49 years (70), 30-39 and 50-59 years (59 cases each) age groups.  The vaccination status was recorded for 266 (46.5%) cases. Of these, 74 were reported as not vaccinated (including two cases aged less than 6 weeks and therefore not eligible for vaccination), four received one dose of vaccine, 22 received three or more doses, including 17 who had received all five doses, and 166 were reported as being vaccinated but no dose information was available. Of the cases where the relevant information was recorded, 47.6% (172/361) attended school, pre-school or childcare, and 46.8% (89/190) had contact with a laboratory-confirmed pertussis case.
  •    Ross River virus infection:  One case of Ross River virus infection was notified in May 2012.  The case had been in the Australian outback during the incubation period. Confirmatory laboratory results from a reference laboratory are pending. 
  •     Shigellosis: 15 cases of shigellosis were notified in May 2012 compared with 12 cases notified in the previous month and five cases in the same month of the previous year. Cases were from the following DHBs: Capital and Coast (4 cases), Canterbury (3 cases), Auckland and Bay of Plenty (2 cases each), Northland, Waitemata, Waikato and Southern (1 case each). The serotype involved was identified in 13 cases: Shigella sonnei biotype a (4), S. sonnei biotype g (3 cases), S. sonnei biotype f, S. flexneri, S. flexneri 1, S. flexneri 2b, S. flexneri 4a, and S. flexneri 6 biotype Manchester (1 case each). Overseas travel during the incubation period was recorded for eight cases. Countries visited included India (2 cases), Fiji, Samoa, Vanuatu, Indonesia, South America and Nepal (1 case each).
  •     Taeniasis: Three laboratory confirmed cases of taeniasis were notified in May 2012. Two cases (a male aged 30-39 years, and a female aged 40-49 years) are thought to have contracted their disease in Thailand. The third case, a female aged 15-19 years had been exposed in Africa. All three cases were reported from Counties Manukau DHB.
  •     Yersiniosis: 45 cases of yersiniosis were notified in May 2012, compared to 37 cases notified in the previous month and 22 cases in the same month of the previous year (Figure 2). Waitemata DHB had the highest numbers of cases recorded (13 cases), followed by Waikato (8 cases), Northland (6 cases), Auckland and Counties Manukau (4 cases each) DHBs. Cases occurred in all age groups, with the highest numbers reported in the 1-4 years (8), 20-29 years (7), and 30-39 years (6) age groups. One case was hospitalised. The biotype involved was identified in 37 (82.2%) of the cases: Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 4 (21 cases), Y. enterocolitica biotype 2 (10), Y. enterocolitica biotype 1A (4) and Y. enterocolitica biotype 3 (2).  Among the cases for which risk factor information was recorded, 40.0% (2/5) consumed food from a food premises, 20.0% (1/5) had contact with faecal material, and 10.0% (1/10) had attended school, pre-school or childcare during the incubation period. 

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Report:

Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - May 2012

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - May 2012

Monthly DHB Totals - May 2012

Monthly Rolling Totals - May 2012

 

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Monthly Notifiable Disease Surveillance Report - May 2012

Tables:

Monthly National Totals - May 2012

Monthly DHB Totals - May 2012

Monthly Rolling Totals - May 2012

Ph: +64 4 914 0700 Fax: +64 4 914 0770 Email: survqueries@esr.cri.nz